Read Dark Justice (Sean Dillon Series, Book 12) by Jack Higgins Online

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A fabulous contemporary thriller from the master of the genre the author of the international bestsellers Midnight Runner, A Fine Night for Dying and Bad Company.Sean Dillon is back in another heart stopping, adrenalin laced adventureWhen the president s right hand men foil a plan to assassinate him Sean Dillon is called upon to trace the would be killer s historyIt appears the assassin is British with Muslim connections, and suddenly Dillon is on a trail that leads him to England, Russia and Iraq, where he prepares for the deadliest challenge of his life....

Title : Dark Justice (Sean Dillon Series, Book 12)
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : B0054PIME2
ISBN13 : -
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Language : Englisch
Publisher : HarperCollins 14 Juni 2011
Number of Pages : 207 Pages
File Size : 784 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Dark Justice (Sean Dillon Series, Book 12) Reviews

  • Donald Mitchell
    2020-01-07 14:19

    If you read either Bad Company or Midnight Runner, this book will seem familiar to you. A new man, Josef Belov, has stepped into the Rashid holdings after Baron von Berger died in a plane crash, and provides a new source of villainy aimed at the Middle East oil fields. The money and the background this time are Russian, and you will feel at times as though you are back in the Cold War as well as up against the IRA.As the book opens, a terrorist assassin named Henry Morgan stalks the U.S. president. The trail the assassin leaves behind leads to a mosque in London and suggests a wider terror network aimed at destabilizing Iraq.While consulting with the president, General Charles Ferguson leads a counter attack to locate the terrorist organization and to stop it. As usual, Ferguson relies heavily on Sean Dillon, Major Roper, Hannah Bernstein and Dillon's allies, the Salters.The opposition draws heavily on experienced Russian intelligence personnel who are now freelancing, as well as other freelance operatives.Soon Ferguson and the opposition are well aware of one another and are racing to gain strategic advantages. Along the way, there are lots of threats, bragging and by-play. Every 40 pages or so, there's a brief violent confrontation. This conflict is enhanced by Belov's antipathy towards Ferguson and his team.The backdrop of the story is more interesting than many of Mr. Higgins's thrillers. There are cameo appearances by world leaders and lots of references to the antiterrorist methods now being used in the U.K. The book gently raises the question about whether the antiterrorist forces should have unrestrained authority or not . . . and seems to suggest that they should.As usual, character development is minimal and ideas are few and far between. But if you like having gun battles every so often in your stories, this book will do just as well as any other gun-filled thriller.As for writing style, some will find this book a little too spare in its descriptions. An entire gun fight can be concluded in a handful of paragraphs.May you live with love and in peace.

  • Donald Mitchell
    2019-12-26 16:34

    If you read either Bad Company or Midnight Runner, this book will seem familiar to you. A new man, Josef Belov, has stepped into the Rashid holdings after Baron von Berger died in a plane crash, and provides a new source of villainy aimed at the Middle East oil fields. The money and the background this time are Russian, and you will feel at times as though you are back in the Cold War as well as up against the IRA.As the book opens, a terrorist assassin named Henry Morgan stalks the U.S. president. The trail the assassin leaves behind leads to a mosque in London and suggests a wider terror network aimed at destabilizing Iraq.While consulting with the president, General Charles Ferguson leads a counter attack to locate the terrorist organization and to stop it. As usual, Ferguson relies heavily on Sean Dillon, Major Roper, Hannah Bernstein and Dillon's allies, the Salters.The opposition draws heavily on experienced Russian intelligence personnel who are now freelancing, as well as other freelance operatives.Soon Ferguson and the opposition are well aware of one another and are racing to gain strategic advantages. Along the way, there are lots of threats, bragging and by-play. Every 40 pages or so, there's a brief violent confrontation. This conflict is enhanced by Belov's antipathy towards Ferguson and his team.The backdrop of the story is more interesting than many of Mr. Higgins's thrillers. There are cameo appearances by world leaders and lots of references to the antiterrorist methods now being used in the U.K. The book gently raises the question about whether the antiterrorist forces should have unrestrained authority or not . . . and seems to suggest that they should.As usual, character development is minimal and ideas are few and far between. But if you like having gun battles every so often in your stories, this book will do just as well as any other gun-filled thriller.As for writing style, some will find this book a little too spare in its descriptions. An entire gun fight can be concluded in a handful of paragraphs.May you live with love and in peace.